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No Benefit to Cutting Fat in Cheese

Does Not Affect Cholesterol Levels

Yeko Photo Studio/Shutterstock.com

Anyone that has struggled to reduce their intake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad” cholesterol) may have considered avoiding saturated fat in their diets, although the latest meta-study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine now refutes this. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen, in Denmark, conducted a test to determine if consuming low-fat versus regular cheeses impacts LDL cholesterol levels.

The study divided 139 people into three groups. One ate regular fat cheese, one consumed reduced-fat cheese and one didn’t eat any cheese at all for 12 weeks. Both LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good” cholesterol) levels were tested at the beginning and end of the period. Researchers found no significant difference in the LDL levels of any of the groups and no difference between the HDL levels of the reduced-fat and regular cheese groups, suggesting that consuming low-fat versions has no measurable metabolic benefit.

An increase in HDL levels among those that abstained from eating cheese altogether was noted.


This article appears in the March 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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